Training initially is a 10-15 second explanation which has a quick show and tell presentation of how the system works. The rest of the training takes place on the job. No codes to learn, no key strokes to learn, no long learning curve before and new employee is productive.

The restaurant is displayed just like it was previously on the laminated map, only now there is a way for multiple maps to show the status. It is a natural transition from the laminated map to TABLECHECK. An additional benefit is that staff will learn table numbers quickly because there are several panels easy to view. Plus even when the person doesn't know the table the panels are a handy reference.

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Three basic training steps
Staff proficiency and advanced uses
Training hosts...
Training waiters...
Training bussers...
Training managers...

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Essentially the training consists of three basic steps:

  1. Explaining the concept
  2. Define what red, off, green, amber mean
  3. Show how to change a tables status

Beyond the basics, the finer points are usually conveyed by the more experienced staff and consist of some simple rules for use that are dependant upon the level of activity and staffing in the restaurant.

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As time goes by and they, the staff, become proficient they also come to understand the dynamic communication aspects of the system that directly reflects the uniqueness of each restaurant and the subtle variations and complexities of human communication. In both simple and complex applications TABLECHECK excels. This is a design feature that allows for the system to truly become a tool for dynamic communication which appropriately leaves the thinking and reacting to the staff.

 

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Training hosts... New hosts will often be trained first on updating the panels just after seating a customer/guest. While out on the floor after seating a guest the host will check the correctness of the panel to the tables within view of the panel. As the host person learns more duties they will be trained to manage the host display panel along with the wait list and update tables when seating. Each restaurant is unique to some extent and rules and procedures will vary.

 

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Training waiters... New waiters will learn quickly that looking at their section on the panel can help them keep up with the pace of table turnover in their section.Waiters, because of the nature of their tip income will make sure that the hosts know when their tables turn. As long as the hosts are using TABLECHECK to organize and manage the floor and wait the waiters will be paying close attention.

 

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Training bussers... New bussers will be told that red is dirty. When you see this red light go out on the floor and bus the table(s). They will also check the panels when they unload and if the table is still red they will update it to the available status. As long as the hosts are using TABLECHECK to organize and manage the floor and wait the bussers will be paying close attention.

 

 

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Training managers... Usually managers are the most experienced members of the staff and within an few shifts learn what information gleaned from the panels is helpful. The usual case is that managers can spend their time keeping staff ahead of the rushes, avoiding the crisis of too many tables to clean, seat, serve, feed. Each restaurant has a critical threshold in the each part of the process to greet, seat, serve, feed, bus, and setup the tables. If this threshold is exceeded then the staff falls behind and  fails to deliver good service and products. This is no good! Keeping the restaurant running inside the planned thresholds is the managers primary job. Failure here results in lost revenues and poor customer service. Additionally this usually occurs when the restaurant can make the most money. When the restaurant is busiest, each dollar earned is highly profitable, as much as 75% profit. (This assumes a variable costs of 25%) Most managers when faced with a crisis will temporarily become a host, bussers, waiter/helper, kitchen worker as needed and will go from crisis to crisis trying desperately to keep the situation under control. When they do this they stop leading the entire staff and running the whole restaurant. Remember the manager was hired to organize and run a team of people. Give managers TABLECHECK, the communications tool, so that they can manage 100% of the time.

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